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How different is the Royal Enfield Scram 411 from the Himalayan?-Auto News , Firstpost

It’s clear that Royal Enfield’s idea with the Scram 411 is to provide a more user-friendly motorcycle for the city and occasional off-road pursuits.

How different is the Royal Enfield Scram 411 from the Himalayan?

Royal Enfield Scram 411. (Image: Royal Enfield)

Royal Enfield just recently launched the Scram 411 in India, for a price of Rs 2.03 Lakh (ex-showroom). But, the question lingering in the minds of most buyers will be how different is it really from the Himalayan ADV? For starters, the name suggests that it is a ‘scrambler’ category of motorcycle, which is slightly different from the adventurer-tourer style of the Himalayan. Secondly, the Scram is Rs 11,000 cheaper than Himalayan, and there are a number of reasons for that as well.

First and foremost is the fact that Scram only comes with a single, offset-mounted, instrument cluster. The Tripper navigation system is an optional extra, and it has to be said, looks a lot simpler than the Himalayan’s instrument panel. The Scram also comes with seven different colour options, as compared to the Himalayan’s six. On the whole, Royal Enfield has used brighter and more youthful colours for the Scram. The Himalayan, though, has a more understated and functional look, overall.

The Scram also has a 5mm lower seat height and is, in fact, lighter than the Himalayan as well (5 kilograms). RE has also reduced the ground clearance by 20mm in comparison to the Himalayan. Then there’s the updated handlebar, which now sits closer and lower to the rider, making for a much more urban-friendly motorcycle. In terms of suspension setup, the Scram is pretty much identical to the Himalayan. Except for the fact that the front suspension travel has been lowered by 10mm. The Scram also gets a smaller wheel at the front; a 19-inch one, to be exact.

That makes the Scram a little more agile in city conditions and results in a shorter wheelbase as well. Visually, the windscreen at the front has been omitted and the headlight now sits lower, and there are two side panels on either side of the fuel tank. There’s a new single-piece seat, too, along with a new grab handle at the back and indicators. One thing that remains exactly the same though is the 411cc, single-cylinder engine which produces 24.3hp and 32Nm of torque; and comes mated to the same five-speed transmission.

It’s clear that Royal Enfield’s idea with the Scram 411 is to provide a more user-friendly motorcycle for the city and occasional off-road pursuits. What remains to be seen, however, is the popularity the Scram will garner with the company’s loyal user base.


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